LIKE IT IS:

Patsy Sutton made a difference for many

By: Wally Hall
Published: Friday, January 11, 2013
FILE - In this Friday, May 19, 2006, file photo, Patsy Sutton, right, wife of then-Oklahoma State men's basketball coach Eddie Sutton, smiles as she sits with granddaughter Hallie Sutton, left, as she listens to her husband give his resignation speech during a news conference in Stillwater, Okla. Patsy Sutton, 74, died Tuesday, Jan. 8, 2013, at a Tulsa, Okla., hospital, officials at Ninde Brookside Chapel say. (AP Photo/File)
FILE - In this Friday, May 19, 2006, file photo, Patsy Sutton, right, wife of then-Oklahoma State men's basketball coach Eddie Sutton, smiles as she sits with granddaughter Hallie Sutton, left, as she listens to her husband give his resignation speech during a news conference in Stillwater, Okla. Patsy Sutton, 74, died Tuesday, Jan. 8, 2013, at a Tulsa, Okla., hospital, officials at Ninde Brookside Chapel say. (AP Photo/File)

— This afternoon in Tulsa, one of the great first ladies of Arkansas Razorbacks basketball will be laid to rest.

Patsy Sutton died this week.

Patsy has long been known for her work with former Razorbacks basketball standout Darrell Walker, and last month when Walker completed his degree, she was on hand for his graduation.

Yet, Patsy worked with many of the players, student managers and others much more than anyone remembered.

Several years ago, the Razorbacks had just finished a six-game tournament in Japan, and there was a long day before their flight to Hong Kong. It was Patsy who arranged for every player to visit a jewelry store and buy their mother a gift, and she negotiated the price down to the store’s cost.

She then helped every person pick the right gift.

When her husband Eddie had to deal with the tragedy of the plane crash that took the lives of several Oklahoma State employees, managers and players, she sat quietly by his side as he called every parent and spouse.

When Eddie struggled with alcohol addiction, it was Patsy who had his back.

She will be missed by legions, but never forgotten.

Nolan Richardson will be the guest speaker Monday at the Downtown Tip-Off Club meeting at the North Little Rock Chamber Bank of the Ozarks Conference Center.

Richardson led the Arkansas Razorbacks to the 1994 NCAA championship.

Lunch begins at 11:15 a.m., and the program begins at noon. The lunch buffet is $15 for members and $20 for guests.

When Jared Green decided to transfer from Mississippi Valley State to the Arkansas Razorbacks, it was without fanfare.

Green, a graduate of Little Rock Central, was an All-Southwestern Athletic Conference player with 60 tackles (14 for loss) and 8 sacks, but he had a dream of being a Hog. The chance for him to run through the A was only going to come once.

So he followed his heart, gave up a scholarship, redshirted and put some size and muscle on his 6-0 frame.

In 2011 he played in four games, but he was learning a role that suited him - run stopper.

He had a knack for getting out of blocks and making contact with running backs and quarterbacks or plugging holes, which allowed the linebackers to make plays.

Last season he became a leader and mainstay on the defensive line. In fact, he played so well he will participate today in the Casino Del Sol College All-Star Game in Tucson, Ariz.

More importantly, according to his mom, Shelia Hays, and his dad, Michael Green, he graduated from the UA on Dec. 15.

That’s another true Razorback success story.

Listening to Justin Acri and Pat Bradley on The Zone radio show Thursday morning, it was a little surprising to hear some callers’ early criticism of the Razorbacks basketball team.

So they lost their SEC opener on the road to a decent Texas A&M team? Did the callers notice that Marshawn Powell was in foul trouble and had only two shots and two rebounds?

That the Hogs made only 4 of 15 from the free-throw line, were out rebounded 51-27 and hit just 3 of 15 threes?

All of that spells learning curve. Mike Anderson played 13 guys, and six are in their first season with the Razorbacks.

Youth is not an excuse. It is a fact.

Sports, Pages 17 on 01/11/2013

Discussion

Submit