Hog Calls:

Broyles' cause worth remembering

By: Nate Allen
Published: Saturday, June 7, 2014
Frank Broyles, former University of Arkansas football coach and athletics director, speaks Tuesday, Nov. 26, 2013, during the Fayetteville Chamber of Commerce's annual meeting at the Bulldog Activities and Recreation Center on the Fayetteville High School campus.
Photo by Andy Shupe
Frank Broyles, former University of Arkansas football coach and athletics director, speaks Tuesday, Nov. 26, 2013, during the Fayetteville Chamber of Commerce's annual meeting at the Bulldog Activities and Recreation Center on the Fayetteville High School campus.

— How fitting that the organization combating the condition afflicting those who forget takes the strongest step tonight honoring an Arkansan to remember.

Retiring upon 56 years serving the University of Arkansas as head football coach (1958-76), athletic director (1973-2007) and athletic director emeritus (2008-June 30), Frank Broyles will be honored at the John Q. Hammons Center in Rogers tonight at a banquet that will benefit CareGivers United and the Frank and Barbara Broyles Legacy Foundation in their efforts to help care for those afflicted with Alzheimer’s and especially help their families who cope to provide what care they can.

Broyles’ late wife Barbara, and the mother to their six children, succumbed to Alzheimer’s in 2004.

What Frank Broyles accomplished for the UA, not for only its Razorbacks but the entire university and indeed the entire state of Arkansas, is gargantuan. Not only was he the program’s winningest football coach, he was nationally influential as the school’s athletic director, was a fund-raiser both athletically and academically — which included the UA’s Campaign for Books — and a national ambassador for the state and the school for nine years while working as ABC’s top college football analyst

The fame and acclaim for all that, plus his passionate ability to inspire all, had to be achieved before he could achieve his most important work of all regarding the care of Alzheimer’s patients and their caregivers with his Coach Broyles’ Playbook for Alzheimer’s Caregivers.

Some 600,000 plus copies of Broyles’ first-hand experience caring for his late wife, along with advice and data from experts in Alzheimer’s care, have provided caregivers encouragement, hope and help.

“You have to know your opponent,” Broyles said at Friday’s golf outing that also served as a fundraiser. “So what we are trying to do is teach people what the disease is all about and how to best handle it and have the best quality of life for everybody while they have somebody who suffers with it.”

There is no better way for Arkansas to give back to the man who has given Arkansas so much than by supporting these organizations Broyles founded in an effort to improve the lives of caregivers consumed in never forgetting their loved ones struggling to remember.

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